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Leadership Strategies

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The digital economy has been eagerly anticipated for years, but felt to be in the distant future. As we look towards 2020, we can see the digital economy appear on the horizon. By 2023, products and services from digitally transformed enterprises will account for more than half of the global GDP, according to IDC’s research, signalling digital supremacy.

With the onset of digital supremacy just 3 years away, CEOs will quickly find themselves running a new type of organization. And with that new organization comes a new agenda.

Artificial intelligence (AI) is poised to transform the way that marketing professionals work, and how organizations target, engage and connect with customers and prospects. Just like how marketing automation created new tasks and job functions, AI will revolutionize the way marketing is performed – and dictate a new set of job needs and skills.

This post originally appeared on IDC’s UK Blog, and concentrates on European data. To see the original post, click here.

Digitally determined” organizations no longer ask if something is possible. They assume it is. Corporate leaders identify what they wish to achieve. Those goals are broken into use cases. The organization then works backward to determine what technologies are needed. IT suppliers need to be on board with these use cases. Many suppliers say they put customers first and that they work backward from business goals to create their products.

In an earlier blog about the Future of Work, and in a recent IDC Perspective, we presented IDC’s view of the Future of Work and offered a framework that provides a way to approach and scope the organizational, policy, and technology changes required to leverage this opportunity in a holistic manner. In this blog, we’ll take a closer look at the growing role of technologies like artificial intelligence (AI), robotics, IPA, and augmented and virtual reality (AR/VR) in automating and augmenting the tasks and processes traditionally accomplished by human workers. We’ll also explore how organizations are planning to acquire the skills required to leverage the opportunities for automation and human-machine collaboration.

In the United States today, women account for 47% of the overall workforce, yet only 25% of IT workers are female according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS). The tech industry’s efforts to raise the inclusivity of women as employees have been sporadic and inconsistent over the last 50 years, though the issue has certainly gained more notoriety in recent years. Yet despite employers’ efforts to introduce numerous programs to help educate, hire and retain women in technology, women remain significantly underrepresented at all levels.